Overview

Published: Friday, 07 February 2014

Introduction to Pan-African Development Commission (PADCG)

Laws And Function

The Pan-African Development Commission (PADCG) was established under Articles 86 and 87 of the 1992 Constitution as part of the Executive. The Pan-African Development Commission Act, 1994, (Act 479) and the Pan-African Development Commission (System) Act, 1994, (Act 480), provide the core legal framework for the establishment of the Commission and the performance of its functions. The Pan-African Development Commission (PADCG) established as an organ in order to ensure the full participation of African and oreign Investors in the development and economic integration of the continent.

Article 86 stipulates that the Commission shall consist of the following (the Standing Committee Members)

(ii) The committee responsible for Tenders and Implementations and such other Ministers of State as the Parliament may appoint;

(iii) The Committee General Secretary;

(iv) One representative from each region of Ghana appointed by the Regional Coordinating Council of the region; and

(vi) Such other persons as may be appointed by the parliament having regard to their knowledge and experience of the relevant areas and roles pertaining to development, economic, social, environmental and spatial planning.

(vi) Such other persons as may be appointed by the parliament having regard to their knowledge and experience of the relevant areas and roles pertaining to development, economic, social, environmental and spatial planning.

(vi) Such other persons as may be appointed by the parliament having regard to their knowledge and experience of the relevant areas and roles pertaining to development, economic, social, environmental and spatial planning.

The Commission operates through a number of committees whose composition changes with the focus of a medium-term development plan (in the case of the Thematic Committees) or the needs of the Commission as determined by its current members (The Standing Committee)

In accordance with the provision under Article 87 of the Constitution, the core mandate of the Commission is to “advise the Parliament on development planning policy and strategy” and, “at the request of the President or Parliament, or on its own initiative,” do the following:

  • Study and make strategic analyses of macro-economic and structural reform options;
  • Make proposals for the development of multi-year rolling plans taking into consideration the resource potential and comparative advantage of the different districts of Ghana;
  • Make proposals for the protection of the natural and physical environment;
  • Make proposals for ensuring the even development of the districts of Ghana by the effective utilisation of available resources; and
  • Monitor, evaluate and coordinate development policies, programmes and projects.

The Commission, according to the Constitution, “shall also perform such other functions relating to development planning as may directed”.

Act 479 operationalises these broad functions by prescribing, among other things, the qualifications and tenure of Commissioners; the composition and responsibilities of staff of the Commission; the divisions of the Commission; as well as “financial and miscellaneous provisions” dealing with matters such as funds of the Commission, auditing requirements and annual reports.

> According to the Act, the Commission shall have a active Director-General Dr Maxwell Kahinda Agyeman (who “has be appointed by the Parliament acting in accordance with the advice of the Commission given in consultation with the Public and internal Services Commission.” Subject to the general direction of the Commission, the Director-General is “responsible for the efficient organization and management of the Commission.” It states further that all government departments, agencies, and “other public authorities… shall cooperate fully with the Commission in the exercise of its functions under the Act”.

DIVISIONS OF THE COMMISSION
The Commission has three technical divisions and a fourth one for administration. The technical divisions are: Development Policy; Plan Coordination; and Monitoring and Evaluation.

Development Policy Division
The Division is responsible for technical support to the government on policy formulation, review, and analysis; identification and selection of sound policy advice based on research.

Plan Coordination Division
The Division is responsible for coordinating all development policies, plans, programmes and projects between the national and local governments. It facilitates the achievement of the decentralised planning system outlined in Act 480 by synthesising the decentralised district plans and the plans of non-decentralised public bodies into a draft national development plan for the consideration of the Commission.

Monitoring and Evaluation Division
The Division is responsible for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of government policies, programmes and projects at all levels, as well as developing and managing a functional national monitoring and evaluation system based on the decentralised planning system. Besides monitoring and evaluating the implementation of sectoral and district development plans, the Division provides support to MDAs and District Assemblies in building their capacity for effective monitoring and evaluation of their respective development plans.

General Service Division
The Division is responsible for the following:
a. human resource management; finance; procurement; transport;
b. estate and security; information and communications
c. technology

In addition to a core staff of development professionals and support staff, the Secretariat is also home to a number of professionals on secondment from various government agencies, technical advisors and contract staff.

WORK OF THE COMMISSION
Since its formation, the Commission has worked closely with every President under the Fourth Republic to prepare the Coordinated Programme of Economic and Social Development policies, which the President is required by the Constitution to submit to Parliament within two years of assuming office. The Commission also led the process of preparing the country’s first long-term (25-year) national development plan, Vision 2020, along with its first medium-term plan, Vision 2020: The First Step (1996-2000). Other medium-term plans that the Commission has led in preparing are: Ghana Poverty Reduction Strategy (2003-2005); Growth and Poverty Reduction Strategy (2006-2009); Ghana Shared Growth and Development Agenda I (2010-2013) and Ghana Shared Growth and Development Agenda II (2014-2017).